Bayville HomeBay QuestMeal DealH2 Oh No!Bay LabMonsters?Chesapeake ChampsBay TheaterLogin
Classroom Resources

For More Information on the Chesapeake

Explore these resources to find out more about the past, present, and future of the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

 

Other Sites of Interest

Sites for Adults and Kids

These sites are appropriate for both audiences. However, kids may need some supervision or assistance.

Website and Description

General

BayQuest

Meal Deal

SAV Lab

H2Oh No!

Here There Be Monsters

One of the best sites for any information on the Chesapeake Bay is the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program website. It is a great place to start your search for information on Bay animals, plants, habitats, pollution, restoration, policy, and history.

You can also research information about each sub-watershed. This includes statistics, graphs, and “state of the sub-watershed” information.

Note to Teachers: Students can use this site, but their navigation must be facilitated. There are certain parts of the site that are written for young people (for example, Bay Photos, Facts, and Fun), but the majority of content is for adults. The general language level might be suitable for more advanced readers. There is also a printable document called Chesapeake Bay: An Introduction to an Ecosystem. While this is not written for students, it is a 40-page overview of Bay habitats, living resources, and challenges. It’s got great quick facts in the margins that might be good to pull for your students.

Fairfax County Public Schools ecology website for elementary school students has a wealth of information about many plant and animal species in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Its focus is on creatures in Northern Virginia, but most of those same plants and animals can be found throughout the watershed.

The site contains lesson plans; information on relationships between creatures; food webs; descriptions of the various habitats; and a glossary.

The animal and plant fact sheets include many pictures of each species. But the bulk of the site is text-heavy. None of the text is written above an eighth grade level.

 

 

 

The United States Geological Survey has a Water Science for Schools web site. The USGS is the country’s authority on the water and hydrology, and their site is incredibly thorough. It has general information about water, detailed descriptions of all phases of the water cycle, information on water availability, uses of water, problems in the water cycle (acid rain, urbanization, etc.), frequently asked questions, and activities.

It is written for students, so the language level is not advanced. It’s also available in Spanish, and the water cycle graphic is available in over fifteen different languages. The site is chock full of information, and there are hidden gems all throughout.

 

 

 

 

 

The Environmental Protection Agency has a site specifically for students about drinking water and groundwater. It has games for kids, as well as lesson plans and activities for teachers that are segmented by grade level.

 

 

 

 

Earth & Sky is a daily radio series about astronomy and earth sciences. On their website you can hear some of their broadcasts. EarthCare features stories about conservation and Earth stewardship. Also students can participate in online chats with scientists, and there are opportunities for students to create science radio shows.
The Earth and Sky website offers a list of links specifically about the Chesapeake Bay]. Most of the sites link to various Chesapeake Bay Project or Maryland Department of Natural Resources pages.

 

 

 

 

Every year since 1998, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation has published a “state of the Bay” report. These reports are great resources for looking at specific bay issues. They assign grades (A, B+, F, etc.) to various indicators, such as nutrient pollution, fisheries (rockfish and oyster, for example), and habitats (forest, wetlands, etc.). Kids can easily identify with the grades and with the graphic representations that indicate change in the conditions (up arrows = improvement, for example).

 

 

 

Back to top

 

Sites for Kids

Young people can get on and navigate without any help from an adult.

Website and Description

General

BayQuest

Meal Deal

SAV Lab

H2Oh No!

Here There Be Monsters

On the Scholastic Explorers website, kids can research endangered ecosystems, learn how investigate their local waterways, and learn about cultures around the country. There are some interactive games, including one about food webs. Each interactive has its own teacher resource section with lesson plans and things of interest.

 

   

 

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources created a site for students about Chessie, other sea serpents, and cryptozoology. The language level is suitable for middle school.

         

Ecokids is Earth Day Canada's environmental education program for youth who care about the planet. Their website is made just for kids, and is very interactive. It includes lots of educational games (divided into four sections: environmental issues, wildlife, science and nature, and energy), a chat room, interactive stories, and an art gallery. There is a fun activity about the food chain, as well as many others.
There is also a teacher section, with lesson plans and resources though this was developed for teachers in Canada.

 

 

 

The Bell Museum of Natural History in Minnesota offers an interactive game about watershed protection. It puts students in the role of being a city official who must make decisions about the development of a neighborhood, a city, agricultural land, and a national park. These decisions are scored, with detailed explanations given about the choices site users made.

     

 

The Environmental Protection Agency has a general site for elementary and middle school students. It offers information about air and water quality issues, ecosystems and watersheds, conservation and restoration, and plants and animals. There are some interactive activities and games.

There is also a companion site for high schoolers and a companion site for teachers.

   

 

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources created the Environmental Education for Kids (EEK!) site. It was designed so that young people can easily navigate it on their own. It has information on invasive species, animals, habitats, endangered species, air and water, recycling, and environmental restoration. There are many games and activities, too.

There is also a teacher resource section.

 

 

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources designed a kid-friendly portal to their website. It’s written in more accessible language, links to various games and activities, and also links to other parts of their site for more information about certain topics (though some of this information isn’t necessarily written for kids). One of the cool things that it offers is a special guide to Chesapeake plant and animal life.

     

 

Back to top

 

Sites for Adults

These sites are written mainly for adults, and, sometimes, specifically for teachers.

Website and description

General

BayQuest

Meal Deal

SAV Lab

H2Oh No!

Here There Be Monsters

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources has a page for teachers, with information about all kinds of Bay-related professional development opportunities and DNR curriculum.

         

Chesapeake Science on the Internet for Educators (ChesSIE) is a portal for K-12 teachers for all things Bay-related. It provides comprehensive lists and web links of organizations, field trips, activities, lesson plans, Bay information, programs, and  professional development opportunities. It caters to teachers in Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Washington, D.C.

         

The Sultana Project’s website gives more information about the Sultana, their replica of an 18th century schooner. Visit the site for information about tours and educational programs that are offered on shore and aboard the Sultana.

 

       

Bay Grasses News, published by the Maryland DNR, has all kinds of up-to-date articles about the state bay grasses, general information about bay grasses, links to related restoration projects, and education links for teachers.

     

   

The Maryland Sea Grant is one of the premier Chesapeake Bay research centers. In the Chesapeake Bay section you can find a wealth of articles and information on many Bay topics, including Bay creatures, people and cultures, problems, and restoration.

The Marine Education link is for teachers, and has lesson plans, programs, videos, grant opportunities, etc.

Their Online Network News is a publication for Maryland educators that offers general Bay-related science news of interest, professional development opportunities, and grant information.

 

 

A very thorough curriculum about sustainable development and “smart growth” is available through a collaboration between the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Maryland State Department of Education, Maryland Office of Smart Growth, and Maryland Department of Planning.

Where Do We Grow from Here? has 20 units with lesson plans and both printable and online resources. Topics include the concept of smart growth, alternative sources of transportation, city planning for lower environmental impact, habitat restoration, patterns of urban development, how to plan communities, economic and racial segregation in communities, nitrogen pollution, farming and agriculture, and community mapping. Warning: some of the online links are broken.

       

 

The Alliance for the Chesapeake publishes the Bay Journal. It is an online magazine that has articles on many Bay-related issues, restoration projects, and pertinent events (cleanups, tours, etc.). It is updated regularly, so it is always current.

         

The Anacostia Watershed Society website provides news articles, information, and advocacy and education programs specifically related to the Anacostia River—one of the most polluted rivers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and in the country.

         

The Chesapeake Bay Trust is a great resource that offers grant money for teachers who want to do Bay-related projects. If you would like to get your students involved in any restoration projects, this is a great site to start finding money and information.

         

The Baltimore County Public Schools library information services division put together a site specifically for middle school science teachers. It is a compilation of websites pertaining to various science topics, divided by grade for easy navigation.

         

Back to top

Resource LibraryClassroom ResourcesFor FamiliesCreditsThinkport.org
MPT - Maryland Public TelevisionThinkport
© 2005-2011 Maryland Public Television. All Rights Reserved.
Project funding provided by:
Star SchoolsReady to TeachNOAA B-WET