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Classroom Resources

Here There Be Monsters

Teacher's Guide

Introduction and Standards

Is there really a sea monster prowling through the Chesapeake, or is this creature merely a folk legend that people love to tell on wind-swept nights? In this interactive, students will explore the fact and fiction of the legend, using their own powers of observation to make an informed judgment.

The story begins with the report by a pair of watermen who claim they have spotted Chessie, as the press has dubbed this mythic sea monster. Bayville is in an uproar. The mayor holds a press conference, explaining the official town line on the sighting. But the user gets to the meeting after the conference, and must gather information and opinions by talking with the townspeople that have gathered to hear the mayor. Students have to sort out fact from opinion as they explore information about personal sightings, the kind of habitat a large Bay creature would need, and other factors, including the manatee also dubbed Chessie, to make a decision about whether the sightings are real or not.

Students will present that decision to the PROduction Company, recommending whether or not the Company should include this story in their miniseries.

But the story has a twist . . .

Standards Addressed

 

Science Standards

1. Skills and Processes – Students will demonstrate the thinking and acting inherent in the practice of science.

Grades 6-8
A. Constructing Knowledge

  1. Design and carry out simple investigations and formulate appropriate conclusions based on data obtained.
    1. Develop the ability to clarify questions and direct them toward objects and phenomena that can be described, explained, or predicted by scientific investigations.
    2. Explain and provide examples that hypotheses are valuable, even if they turn out not to be true, if they lead to fruitful investigations.
    3. Give examples of when further studies of the question being investigated may be necessary.

B. Applying Evidence and Reasoning

  1. Review data from a simple experiment, summarize the data, and construct a logical argument about the cause-and-effect relationships in the experiment.
    1. Explain that what people expect to observe often affects what they actually do observe and that scientists know about this danger to objectivity and take steps to try to avoid it when designing investigations and examining data.
    2. Explain that even though different explanations are given for the same evidence, it is not always possible to tell which one is correct.
    3. Question claims based on vague statements or on statements made by people outside their area of expertise.

3.0       Life Science – The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time.

Grade 5
Diversity of Life

  1. Explain the idea that in any particular environment, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, some less well, and some cannot survive at all.
    1. Based on observations of features and behaviors of animals and plants from very different environments describe reasons that they might not survive if their environment changed or if they were moved from one environment to another.
    2. State reasons why certain animals such as whales, salmon, could not survive in the Chesapeake Bay.

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Language Arts Standards

General Reading Processes:
Vocabulary: Students will use a variety of strategies and opportunities to understand word meaning and to increase vocabulary.

Grade 6, 7, 8
D.  Vocabulary

  1. Develop and apply vocabulary through exposure to a variety of texts
    1. Acquire new vocabulary through listening to, independently reading, and discussing a variety of literary and informational texts

1.0 General Reading Processes:
Comprehension: Students will use a variety of strategies to understand what they read (construct meaning).

Grade 6,
E.  General Reading Comprehension

  1. Develop and apply comprehension skills through exposure to a variety of texts, including traditional print and electronic texts
    1. Listen to critically, read, and discuss texts representing diversity in content, culture, authorship, and perspective, including areas, such as race, gender, disability, religion, and socio-economic background

Grade 7
E. General Reading Comprehension

  1. Apply comprehension skills through exposure to a variety of texts, including traditional print and electronic texts
    1. Listen to critically, read, and discuss texts representing diversity in content, culture, authorship, and perspective, including areas, such as race, gender, disability, religion, and socio-economic background

Grade 8

  1. Apply and refine comprehension skills through exposure to a variety of texts, including traditional print and electronic texts
    1. Listen to critically, read, and discuss texts representing diversity in content, culture, authorship, and perspective, including areas, such as race, gender, disability, religion, and socio-economic background

Grade 6
A. Comprehension of Informational Text

  1. Develop and apply comprehension skills by reading a variety of self-selected and assigned print and electronic informational texts
    1. Read, use, and identify the characteristics of nonfiction materials to gain information and content knowledge
  2. Identify and use text features to facilitate understanding of informational texts
    1. Use online features

Grade 7
A. Comprehension of Informational Text

  1. Apply comprehension skills by selecting, reading, and interpreting a variety of print and electronic informational texts
    1. Read, use, and identify the characteristics of primary and secondary sources of academic information
  2. Analyze text features to facilitate understanding of informational texts
    1. Analyze online features that contribute to meaning

Grade 8
A. Comprehension of Informational Text

  1. Apply and refine comprehension skills by selecting, reading, and analyzing a variety of print and electronic informational texts
    1. Read, use, and identify the characteristics of primary and secondary sources of academic information
  2. Analyze text features to facilitate and extend understanding of informational texts
    1. Analyze online features that contribute to meaning
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